UnitedHealthcare Community Plan of Texas Donates Hasbro’s NERF ENERGY Game Kits to Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Houston

Marian Cabanillas (far right) of UnitedHealthcare Community Plan of Texas distributed NERF Energy Game Kits to members of Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Houston.

UnitedHealthcare donated 150 NERF ENERGY Game Kits this week to Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Houston to encourage kids to become more active. The donation is part of a national initiative between Hasbro and UnitedHealthcare, featuring Hasbro’s NERF products that are designed to get kids moving through “exergaming.”

Each kit features a NERF ENERGY Game Band, a NERF PRO FOAM soccer ball and instructions to download the NERF ENERGY RUSH mobile game. As kids participate in physical activity, they earn “energy points” that are tracked by the activity band, and these points turn into screen time to play the mobile game on a smartphone or tablet.

UnitedHealthcare is donating 10,000 NERF Energy Game Kits to elementary schools and community organizations across the country.   

Kids were led through exercises with UnitedHealthcare mascot, Dr. Health E. Hound, to test their new NERF ENERGY Game Kit that tracks activity.

Prescribed An Opioid? Ask Your Doctor (or Dentist) These Questions

If your doctor or dentist prescribes a pain reliever, take charge of your health and find out exactly what you are getting. UnitedHealth Group medical experts recommend you ask your doctor these questions about any opioid prescription. Common opioid brand names include Vicodin and Percocet.

  1. Why do I need this medicine?
    Ask your doctor for reasons why it is right for you.
  2. Are there other options that will address my pain? 
    Opioids are not the only option for treating pain. Other options are available. An over-the-counter pain reliever (such as Tylenol®, Aleve® or Advil®) may be enough, or, physical therapy or chiropractic care could give the same results.
  3. How long do I take this? 
    Extended opioid use can increase the risk of dependence and addiction. Talk with with your doctor about a how long you should take the medicine and whether it should be refilled.
  4. Does this medicine line up with current medical guidelines?
    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has published specific guidelines, directing doctors to prescribe the lowest dose for the shortest length of time possible.
  5. What are my risks for addiction?
    Some people may be more prone to addiction than others. A report published by the CDC suggests that the risk of chronic opioid use rises with each additional day after the third day, with a steep rise after the fifth day.
  6. How does this medicine mix with other medicines I’m taking?
    Opioids can be deadly when mixed with other drugs, especially those taken for treatment of anxiety, sleeping disorders and seizures. It’s a bad idea to mix alcohol with an opioid pain reliever.
  7. What are the expected side effects?
    These vary. They might include feeling sick to your stomach, sleepiness, extreme excitement, itching and more. Talk with your doctor.

There are times when opioid medications are the right way to help people manage acute or long-term pain. And it’s most important that those medications are provided at the right dose for the right length of time.

For additional information and resources visit https://newsroom.uhc.com/opioids.html.

UnitedHealthcare of North Texas Discusses the Future of Health Care in Garland

(far right) Scott Flannery, UnitedHealthcare of North Texas CEO, led Monday’s panel discussion. Also appearing were (from left) Ken Hutchenrider Jr., Methodist Richardson Medical Center president, Dr. Eric Beshires, family medicine physician at Baylor University Medical Center, and Jenny Williams, manager of community outreach at Baylor Scott & White Health.

UnitedHealthcare of North Texas CEO Scott Flannery joined other leading health professionals to discuss the future of health care in Garland on Feb. 26. The panel discussion was part of the Garland Chamber of Commerce’s Strong Partnerships and Relevant Knowledge (SPARK) series.

Flannery spoke about the effects of health care at the legislative level, options for the uninsured or the underinsured, the importance of having a primary care physician and the consequences of rising costs on providers, employers and consumers.